Evan Biddell’s VVbyEB 81lb Challenge

 

“I think that if you do have a voice, and you see something wrong in the world as an artist, you have to point it out. It’s the only way it’s going to change.”

Evan Biddell ~ fashion designer

Check out the short promo in the link below, as Evan rocks the runway.  [longer versions of this video are at the end of this blog post]

https://www.facebook.com/CBCArts/videos/1482984508392079/

Us RUDE Guys point out the wrongs of rampant fast fashion, by wearing our signature folly which is Scavenger Style.

We walk our talk and dress in the discards of others.  We have grown up wearing hand-me-downs and remade clothes.

For over a decade we have worn Scavenger Style 365 days of the year and 24/7.

95% of textiles can be recycled therefore we say NO WAY to landfill when it comes to our clothes and bed linens.

Stop buying it and beat The Man.  It’s the only way it stops!

 

 

 

Check out the 81 pound collection’s images below.

https://myalbum.com/album/ZisBoPybgc3M

Trashed Textiles

I remember at the age of five travelling on a trolley car with my mother past a group of women on a picket line at a textile plant, seeing them being viciously beaten by security people. So that kind of thing stayed with me.

Noam Chomsky

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RUDE Girl could not agree more with Dorothy Cosonas .  When I go down to the point of landfill to rescue textiles, destined for the garment graveyard, my eyes are seriously focused on the pile of clothes and fabrics in front of me.

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Textiles in a TIP SHOP at point of landfill

I have like a sixth sense for what it is I am seeking, among the mostly fast fashion synthetics.  I scourer for natural fibre fabric, unusual print, different texture, interesting colours, country of origin, brand, quality stitching and unique design.  I will not overlook tired synthetics totally, and have picked up clothes for around the house and garden. 

I am really pleased that most of the textiles I rescue, are not of interest to other pickers.  If they were, then I would definitely not find them to rescue.  These would have been snatched up by other pickers, right?


Photos above:  Place mouse over each photo and click to get details.

I usually do not know at the time what I will be reusing the rescued garments for.  The inspiration comes during the sorting and washing process at home.  Or at a later time when I am in my studio creating.  It’s reassuring to know I have a stash of rescued garments that I can immediately revisit for reuse.

The challenge I find, is keeping this stash of garments under manageable control.  Because I make just for myself,  I find I can only wear so much that I re-create.  Once or twice a year I have an audit and decide what is to be given to to friends or donated to charity.

Beat The ‘fast fashion’ Man by wearing trashed textiles that have been rescued and revamped.

Better NOW than Never

“There is a next time for NOW because I think never is not all that sustainable”   Karen Ellis / Reuser of Unloved Discarded Excess

For Fashion Revolution Day today the 24 April, 2015 I decided to demonstrate that reasonable quality fast fashion from KMart can be sustainable.

There is so much talk about how fast fashion is not sustainable and RUDE agrees to a point.  The amount of fast fashion garments ending up in landfill is frightening.  And the consequences on people and planet of the fast fashion industry and our insatiable desire for new is alarming.

I do not plan to go into details here about the woes of our hunger to consume and spend.  And many of you will already be following the fast fashion industry’s shameful legacy on other forums.  You can Goggle all about the topic.

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This good condition NOW garment by KMart in the above photo, was rescued from the point of landfill and was free.  It’s not just the responsibility of the fashion industry, consumers also have responsibility to care for their garments whether fast fashion or not, right?

When I spotted this gem in the pile of clothes at my local Tip Shop it was clean but looked sad  and devoid of human heart.  Maybe because it had been pieced together in an environment that cared little about uniqueness, and more about rapid turnover.

The hoodie was the same fabric and had a bright white thin cotton tape through it to tie around the neck.  The neck  had a 5 inch slit down the front and the edges of it had been overlocked/serged.  The back of the garment was too short, and riding up my back.

To make this garment sustainable it firstly had to be rescued from the dirty and smelly clothes around it.  But even one step before that it had to have someone like me recognise its potential.  Obviously nobody, before me had realised the value in this garment.  I initially, threw it to one side as I continued to scavenge for more interesting clothes.  But then I remembered that I was keen to demonstrate that unsustainable fast fashion can become sustainable with a bit of tender loving care and a mend and make new ethos.

This garment came home and was placed in a laundry bag, soaked overnight and then washed.  The laundry bag prevents piling and protects the fabric from too much agitation of the fibres.

The NOW tag was removed [I do not like tags on clothes].  In my mind, I created a new top with some uniqueness.  I was then responsible for the entire re-design of the garment.  My hands made the re-make happen.  I personalised this top for me, and it really reflects everything that RUDE [reuse of unloved discarded excess] stands for. 

RUDE will send this blog post to KMart to show the company it can also get more sustainable by encouraging the actions of its customers to upcycle its garments.  In other words people really do have the power to make companies like KMart think differently about their clothes and garment design.

Here is the video showcasing my new not NOW windcheater.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X9bsDR8kmwU&feature=player_detailpage

Beat The Man and join the ReFashion of Fast Fashion Revolution!

Strutting Sashiko Scavenger Style

Really, what are the options? Levi’s or Wranglers. And you just pick one. It’s one of those life choices.

Harrison Ford

RUDE’S scavenger style represents our political and economical fashion statement against throwaway fast fashion.  We have not purchased new clothes for decades.  And what we have been wearing for the past five years is mostly all sourced from the point prior to landfill.  We seek out and rescue a couple of items, once a fortnight, from the piles of garments at the local Tip Shed, adjacent to the local recycling transfer station.

Photo below:  Garments and textiles at the City of Melton’s Tip Shop in Melbourne, Australia.  Most of these items will not even be downcycled, and will end up in landfill.  Amongst these piles of clothes are denim jeans that are worn and torn.

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At the moment, RUDE cannot help feeling a bit smug because Jigsaw clothing brand has just released its For Life Not Landfill campaign. [photo above]   It’s validation for us that our scavenger style’s political and economic fashion statement is leading the way!  How utterly awesome is that thought for us, even if nobody else acknowledges it, we too are leaders in creative ways to advertise landfill textile waste.

RUDE boys red tab Levis as posted here would have been considered by many to be ready for the rag-bag.  And would not have looked out-of-place amongst the clothes found in these cots above.

Mending using the Japanese technique of reinforcing fabric with more fabric and running stitches, has ensured that Danny will be wearing his loved Levis for another 15 years!  Danny’s legs will be strutting and showcasing sashiko scavenger style.  How awesome is that!

We did Twitter the Levi company this good news but it has not replied.

Photo below:  Sashiko mended by RUDE Girl, a pair of vintage red tab Levis

SAMSUNGThank you Dave Towbridge from California in the USA for your comment on Google+ in relation to the above photo as follows:

This is something Friends could certainly get behind. A beautiful example of how the Testimony of Simplicity does not require wearing ugly or uninteresting clothing.

Beat The Man and keep textiles out of landfill!  And like RUDE and Jigsaw advertise your efforts.

Signature Folly

SAMSUNGAbove:  From Jonathan Adler’s 100 Ways to Happy Chic Your Life – Adopt a signature folly and think of it as branding for the self.  It can be satirical, lifestyle or anything else that sets you apart from the hoi polloi.

DSC04598Above:  Scavenger Style photo comes alive in this video https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=ip-No-9ytcc

RUDE’S signature folly is it’s very own creation and we have branded it Scavenger Style.  And no it’s not grunge style and no it’s not punk style .  These two styles may have some of the same elements but Scavenger Style stands out because there is no Scavenger fashion movement, promoted by celeb fashion designers, that RUDE is aware of.

And by that we mean NO trendy designers, physically rescuing and cleaning, wearing [sometimes refashioning] and showcasing mostly fast fashion and textiles saved from a dirt hole in the ground.

Scavenger Style makes not only a fashion design and style statement but also an economical and political statement.  RUDE has created a way to wear worn, comfortable and stylish clothes and also contribute to saving the planet and our pennies.

We have worn Scavenger Style from landfill for the past 6 years 24/7!  Like Anna Wintour’s bob and Alex Perry’s sunglasses it sets us apart from the hoi polloi [mass majority] for sure.

But RUDE finds it ironic that worn wear aka Scavenger Style would normally be associated with the ‘great unwashed’,  In our rude little world this is definitely not the case.  We are wealthy washed westerners and Scavenger Style is simply our signature folly.

Beat the Man and be ridiculous riff raff!

#insideout

#insideout

On 24 April 2014 RUDE [Karen] participated in Fashion Revolution Day. Whilst I do not wear my clothes #insideout everyday, I do wear worn clothes REscued from landfill 24/7 365 days of the year for 5 years.

My political fashion statement is Scavenger Style. This is unique to me. I showcase to the world, the wearing and oftentimes REfashioning of fast fashion garments saved direct from the point of landfill. I have asked Sass Brown author of Refashioned if she knows of any designers sourcing garments and textiles direct from landfill. She has informed me that not to her knowledge. Redress is an organisation in Hong Kong that sources from a textiles’ warehouse but does not go down to point of landfill.

http://redressraleigh.com/blog/2014/5/6/sass-brown-fashion-activist-to-speak-at-reftc-2014

I am sure there are other people mostly in third world countries that out of dire necessity wear clothes from landfill. Where my situation differs is that I do not live in poverty, far from it. However, by wearing worn, I choose to be reminded daily of the people who make the fast fashion that I REuse.

When I go down to the point of landfill [the dump] it’s not a pleasant environment. It smells and it is dirty. I am there with other scavengers. These are mostly people who trade in clothes, junk and bric a brac at markets and on Ebay. This type of scavenger is ruthless and would knock you over to get anything of value. The smell of these people is worse than that of the pungent odours emanating from household rubbish.

I find that the clothes I am seeking to wear and REfashion are in abundance. Most days there are three baby cots full of fast fashion. Traders are not interested in anything that’s worn and torn so I get the best stuff. Woollen garments with holes, vintage clothes with stains, linen garments that are dated and clothes that are hideously embellished. I take the garments the scavengers are unable to sell.

Landfill Lovely

Landfill Lovely

REscuing garments from landfill is a labour of love in many ways. You have to love scrounging around in other people’s cast offs and ignore the odours and dirt. You have to love washing. And in the case of this Suzanne Grae wool/acrylic mix jumper you have to love hand washing. And you have to love the idea of possibility for all the scavenged fast fashion you haul home.

This jumper is very large but it has such possibility. I can make a skirt, leg warmers and maybe a beanie. It is definitely imagined as a skirt and when it’s refashioned I will share it with you in a video.

I have been inspired by Sew It Again Jane Milburn an upcycle colleague and her acyclic REcreations.

http://www.sewitagain.com/2014/06/stretch-the-imagination/#comment-3432

Suzanne Grae is acknowledged as the creator of the original garment. I would like to think the fast fashion brand, if it knew, loved I had saved it from landfill.

https://www.facebook.com/suzannegrae?fref=nf