Evan Biddell’s VVbyEB 81lb Challenge

 

“I think that if you do have a voice, and you see something wrong in the world as an artist, you have to point it out. It’s the only way it’s going to change.”

Evan Biddell ~ fashion designer

Check out the short promo in the link below, as Evan rocks the runway.  [longer versions of this video are at the end of this blog post]

https://www.facebook.com/CBCArts/videos/1482984508392079/

Us RUDE Guys point out the wrongs of rampant fast fashion, by wearing our signature folly which is Scavenger Style.

We walk our talk and dress in the discards of others.  We have grown up wearing hand-me-downs and remade clothes.

For over a decade we have worn Scavenger Style 365 days of the year and 24/7.

95% of textiles can be recycled therefore we say NO WAY to landfill when it comes to our clothes and bed linens.

Stop buying it and beat The Man.  It’s the only way it stops!

 

 

 

Check out the 81 pound collection’s images below.

https://myalbum.com/album/ZisBoPybgc3M

Apron Memories

 

An apron for each day
one for company too
create your own memories
this apron’s just for you.
© Sue Pitchfork 2005~

The Old French root for apron is naperon, “small table cloth.”

I sewed my first apron in high school sewing class and then wore it during home economics class.  It was blue with big white flowers, very 70s.  My name was chain stitched across the front.  The apron is but a memory however the skills learned have served me well.  When I moved out of home in my teens I knew how to cook and sew on a button.

My mother always wore an apron around the house up until last year.  When she went to live in assisted living accomodation, she declared she would no longer be wearing her apron.  I guess for her, it was time to let others do the work.

The one thing I regret is discarding my mother’s self drafted apron pattern.  When she was cleaning out her home I requested one or two of her aprons.  Alas, it was not a priority in the bigger scheme of things, and I never did get an apron.

My mother’s aprons were very practically designed.  And there was no tie loop around the neck, which I discovered over the years, to be a nuisance when suffering from neck aches.

Last weekend I went on my first Op Shop [thrift store] Tour.  It was a free event, organised by a neighbouring Council for National Sustainability Week’s festivities.  1paint
The first Op Shop visited is where I found a modern apron that crossed over my back [image below].  It was originally priced at $4 but due to the 50per cent off sale, I scored it for half price.  Where the safety pin is, I have since sewn the two ties together.

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When I tried it on a home it did not fit well.  I could have worn it ‘as is’ but I knew it would annoy me.  Therefore the last couple of afternoons have been spent in my studio, making alterations to it.

I have darted the front to fix the gaping neck, lengthened the back straps and added two new button holes, replaced small button with larger ones, shortened the hem, added a pocket that was made from a doiley and added cotton ‘lace looking’ braid to the neckline.

As for my mother’s apron style, I am currently making a similar type apron to what she wore, from an old dress picked up a couple if years back at a clothes swap run during National Sustainability Week in the City of Brimbank


Images x3 below:  My finished Barbara Apron [named after my Mum].  I will add a pocket when I come across something I can use.

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Front of the Barbara apron.

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Left side of the Barbara apron

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Back of the Barbara apron

Beat The Man!!

Trashed Textiles

I remember at the age of five travelling on a trolley car with my mother past a group of women on a picket line at a textile plant, seeing them being viciously beaten by security people. So that kind of thing stayed with me.

Noam Chomsky

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RUDE Girl could not agree more with Dorothy Cosonas .  When I go down to the point of landfill to rescue textiles, destined for the garment graveyard, my eyes are seriously focused on the pile of clothes and fabrics in front of me.

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Textiles in a TIP SHOP at point of landfill

I have like a sixth sense for what it is I am seeking, among the mostly fast fashion synthetics.  I scourer for natural fibre fabric, unusual print, different texture, interesting colours, country of origin, brand, quality stitching and unique design.  I will not overlook tired synthetics totally, and have picked up clothes for around the house and garden. 

I am really pleased that most of the textiles I rescue, are not of interest to other pickers.  If they were, then I would definitely not find them to rescue.  These would have been snatched up by other pickers, right?


Photos above:  Place mouse over each photo and click to get details.

I usually do not know at the time what I will be reusing the rescued garments for.  The inspiration comes during the sorting and washing process at home.  Or at a later time when I am in my studio creating.  It’s reassuring to know I have a stash of rescued garments that I can immediately revisit for reuse.

The challenge I find, is keeping this stash of garments under manageable control.  Because I make just for myself,  I find I can only wear so much that I re-create.  Once or twice a year I have an audit and decide what is to be given to to friends or donated to charity.

Beat The ‘fast fashion’ Man by wearing trashed textiles that have been rescued and revamped.

Pick a Pocket

If you want the government off your back, get your hands out of its pockets.

Gary Hart

 

RUDE has four flash drives between us.  And I am always misplacing mine around the house.  Pesky little things they can be.  Gosh, I think one of RUDE Girl’s secondhand flash drives, was found by RUDE Boy in a baby’s cot, at the local tip shop!  Goes to show they can and do end up in all kinds of places.

Yesterday was cold in Melbourne and the perfect opportunity to play with my hand-cranked Singer 179N sewing machine.  I decided to sew up a storage bag for our flash drives.

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Singer 179N hand-cranked Made in Taiwan circa 1960s

Instead of making a bag, I decided to use a ready made pocket.  The day before I had cleaned out my wardrobe.  A pocket on a pair of discarded Rusty brand cargo pants was ideal for this afternoon project.

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Rusty brand cargo pants with pocket cut out

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The pocket

The pocket is ideal as storage because it has a zip.  And the detail makes it unique.

And here is the You Tube video of the finished storage pouch.

https://youtu.be/FBeEGxwBQJk

Beat The Man by not misplacing your stuff and caring for your things!

Some Kind of Beautiful

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RUDE Girl was a bit sidetracked last week with her activism related to textiles.  I am passionate about keeping textiles and garments out of landfill.

Many of you followed my making of a bath mat from tee-shirt yarn over on our Facebook page.  You have to be very keen to rummage through dirty and smelly clothes at landfill, to find  tee shirts to make yarn.  And before you make the yarn you have to soak, wash and dry the tee-shirts!

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Knitted bath mat by RUDE Girl made with recycled tee-shirts sourced from landfill.

To make this tee-shirt bath mat took about 22 tee-shirts and was very labour intensive.  It would have been cheaper and quicker to simply go and buy a bath mat from a department store.

I therefore continue to lobby my municipality for rags and poor quality clothes, to be free of charge, as opposed to them not selling, and then being dumped into landfill.

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Soiled, worn and unsorted textiles, mostly poor quality synthetics at City of Melton’s TIP SHOP, Melbourne, Australia.

Anyway we have been having an issue with our local municipality, namely the Rags’ Ruckus.  The issue looks like it will all be resolved by the end of the week.  We want to thank Councillor Lara Carli for stepping up on our behalf, and really listening to our story.  If she did not know much about the municipality’s Tip Shop, and the health, safety and pricing issues, she does now.

And Bowerbirds Journal member Jacqui for your very empathetic post, particularly your words as follows:

“You have my sympathy, but I know you’ll fight back with logic, evidence and good humour.”

Last week, as support,  I was sent this little highlight from a blog follower.  It’s from the movie Some Kind of Beautiful with Pierce Brosnan.  She urged me to listen to my own advice about The Man.  You will get where she was coming from, when you see the video clip. Here is the link https://youtu.be/_wBl2Tatu34

Shirt Tales

ACME men's tee shirt, large size and printed in Australia. Elvis was rescued from landfill fate.

ACME men’s tee shirt, large size and printed in Australia. Elvis was rescued from landfill fate. This tee shirt is earmarked for an Elvis fanatic, who is a work colleague of RUDE Boy.


I see no reason to have my shirts ironed. It’s irrational.

Barry Commoner

I have a stash of men’s cotton shirts, and I hack them up when the mood takes me.  

Karen Ellis [RUDE Girl] / Textile Hacker

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RUDE Girl’s recycled men’s cotton shirt stash. This long cane laundry basket is full of shirts.

RUDE Girl has been rescuing men’s cotton and linen shirts from landfill fate for a couple of years.  All shirts are soaked, washed and line dried.  And then these are stashed in the cane basket [also saved from landfill fate].  Once this basket is full, I know it is time to re-create.  No more shirts are rescued from anywhere, if this basket is full to the brim.  That’s how I keep my studio textile piles manageable.

Shirt collar bags can be expensive to make, especially if you are purchasing secondhand shirts from charity stores.  My very first bag took 14 shirt collars!!

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RUDE Girl’s first attempt at a shirt collar dillybag.

The more pricey charity stores, sell shirts from $5 to $8 sometimes more, depending on the size and quality.  Therefore if you are keen to make a bag like this, check out other ways and means of scrounging for free and/or cheaper priced shirts. 

Photo below:  Another RUDE shirt collar bag took eight shirt collars to make it.

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RUDE Girl creates dillybags made out of shirt collars.

Not all shirt collars are the same size which can result in construction issues when making this type of bag.  And I strongly advise that you will need a semi-industrial sewing machine with a size 16 needle, to get through the thicknesses, as you attempt to join the collars together.

Check out some of RUDE Girl’s shirt collar dillybags in this video here.

Beat The Man by making your own ready lined fabric for projects, using shirt collars and cuffs.

Rude and Ragged

For me, clothes are kind of character; I don’t follow fashion or understand trends.  Meryl Streep

Humility and knowledge in poor clothes excel pride and ignorance in costly attire.  William Penn

“Cultivate a relationship with your clothing, an investment that directly connects the grower with the maker and the wearer. Repair is an extension of that sentiment, and a deepening of the relationship through wear, and repair, and the honoring of all the embedded stories that led to it.” REWARDROBE Eco Fashion Talk by Sass Brown

Photo below:  RUDE Girl revived this 1980s frock in under an hour for no cost.  It’s what I term a house dress, and I love it to bits because it reflects my mission to always mend and make new.

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For RUDE Girl there is probably no better feeling that RE-vamping a fast fashion garment.  Why?  Because it is a radical gesture.  Many people would not bother to take the time to fix a rag.  And most fast fashion after it is worn and washed a few times, is only good for the rag-bag.

Yesterday, I revived this 1980s rayon frock in the above photo, which I consider to be fast fashion for its time.  The tag had been removed, and the edges had been over locked stitched.  It was probably a little bit better quality than a current cheap fast fashion dress.  Why?  It is rayon not polyester, and has some bust darts to give the bodice shape.

This maxi frock was discovered in a huge pile of clothes at a community garment swap at a local sustainability festival. It was missing a button and had a split up each side.  Both splits had ripped further up the side seams.  The over locking stitch had come away in parts, and there were three tiny holes in the fabric at the front of the dress.  Most people, I believe, would have considered it a rag.  Even the sorting ladies at the local charity shop would have ditched it!

But the frock spoke to me of opportunities for comfortable days around the house. I liked its A line shift style.  I could wear a vintage petticoat under it and in cooler weather a long-sleeved top.  A perfect old dress that sort of reminded me of a dress style from the 1920s and 1960s.

       
SAMSUNGPhoto above: The front skirt piece had three small holes which I covered with crocheted circles from old doilies.

SAMSUNGPhoto above:  The bodice required reinforced over locking under the bust line. As were the side and centre back seams

SAMSUNGPhoto above:  The hem was shortened from maxi to knee-length and a cotton lace attached to the over locked hem edge.


Beat The Man and revive a ragged frock to good as new, if not better than new fast fashion!