Mend or End?

 

images9

Image Source: www

 

20170922_140648

RUDE Boy’s STIHL MS250 (42.5mm) chainsaw

Us RUDE [reusers (and repairers) of unloved discarded excess] Guys take great pride in maintaining our things.  We are not materialistic but we are true materialists.  We cherish, respect and care for the things that serve us well.

The STIHL chainsaw in the above photo was bought new by us about eight or nine years ago.   It has rarely been used and only for domestic use.  RUDE Boy was told and researched that STILH was the best for chainsaws.

Hell, this chainsaw was one of the few things we purchased new and it’s stuffed.  CACTUS!  Reinforces why we are not fans of spending big dollars on things that are manufactured to fail.  Yes, STIHL chainsaws are the best for planned obsolescence!  And yes, we will make sure we share our misfortune in an effort to warn others.

RUDE Boy took the chainsaw in for a service when it stopped working,  He was mortified when he was told the piston and bore had been scored and there was no compression.  He was then told it would cost over $AUD1,000 to repair it with STIHL parts.  Or $AUD670 with after market [generic] parts.

As in this article here [recommended reading], we were faced with the question of mend it or end it.  As we are the  Mend It, Australia team, we feel compelled to try and mend it, and share the experience on our Facebook page.

RUDE Boy has researched and ordered a motor from China for $AUD50.  He is reasonably confident he can replace the old motor with a new motor.  And hopefully, cross fingers and toes, this cheap part will make our hacked STIHL chainsaw serviceable again.

$AUD50 compared to $AUD1000 for repair is a huge difference.  We will try mending before ending.  It’s too early yet to say Beat The Man.  Stay posted.

Oh, and if we have to end it, because it does not work, we have been advised that ALDI sell a good domestic chainsaw for $AUD100.

Advertisements

3 thoughts on “Mend or End?

  1. crazy the cost – we have a 1996 car and realistically it will be its last year as it will not pass the Nationa Car Test/NCT. there is some body work (ireland and seasides = rust) but we are not going to get it done until we can get an inner tyre rod which is normally about 30euro as honda wont sell them for this car unless its part of the stearing pack (1400) and so far no joy on getting one from the scrap yard (and other generic models wont fit this car) …..main reason I am loathed to change cars is this car is a dream – never lets me down and drives beautifully…..

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hi Eimear and thank you for sharing. RUDE Boy suggests going on to ebay to find the tie rod. That’s how he sources parts as well as car wreckers. I drive a 1996 Holden Commodore that RUDE Boy maintains and services. It gets me from A to B and I am not keen for it to be a paddock bomb just yet.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Thanks Karen, we will see what comes up next time – the mechanic who did the car sourced 2 that should have worked but didnt fit exactly, it will be due for service in 2 months so we will see if he can source one again – in general I have found that garages prefer to see the older cars come for service, as 1. they are easier to sort and 2. the people that own them generally will get an annual service to keep them on the road…..

        Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s