The world’s first mall for recycled goods

In Melbourne, Australia, the city of Melton where us RUDE Guys live, our State Government of Victoria has given the go ahead for the large expansion of a landfill. This landfill is set to take rubbish from all over Melbourne and its outer suburbs for the next 13 years.

Australian TIP SHOPS at municipal Recycling Centres have a long long way to go. We could definitely learn something from the Tuna recycling model mall. It’s one type of mall us RUDE Guys would enjoy the window shopping.

Make Wealth History

Last week I wrote about the Edinburgh Remakery, and how they are trying to foster a culture of repair. It’s one of the most shared posts I’ve ever written, and there’s clearly a real interest in this whole idea. Lots of you have been in touch to share similar projects, including this one from Sweden.

ReTuna Återbruksgalleria is a mall dedicated entirely to repaired and upcycled goods. It combines a traditional municipal recycling centre with a shopping centre, so that people can drop off goods that they no longer need, and then browse for something new – perhaps stopping off at the cafe in between. It’s the first mall of its kind in Sweden, and as far as they know, the first in the world.

Staff at the recycling depot intercept and sort incoming goods as they are dropped off, putting aside those that can be repaired or refurbished…

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6 thoughts on “The world’s first mall for recycled goods

  1. Great idea Karen! at Rude Record. It provides a NEW ENTICING INTERFACE between dump-off-your-stuff and have it recycled properly. As the writer describes – city dumps with a circle road to piles of stuff – aren’t easily in a position to be recycled. Furniture and clothes are the obvious ones. Even half empty tins of paint are useful for something. Our local dump had a really good second hand shop close by, but it has closed. They may be transferring or selling directly to other charity shops or antique buyers :((
    Unfortunately there are still folks who will only buy ‘new’ and a place like this one in Sweden could make recycling the ‘norm’, rather than something to be frowned upon. It is the WAY FORWARD to the CIRCULAR ECONOMY.

    Shock horror your local council. More landfill !!!! Oh dear. 😨 There is very little that cannot be recycled. Even broken furniture could be wood chips for garden earth cover and paths. ALL plastic should be recycled.

    I will share on WordPress, if I can do that. And Google Plus, and Twitter.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you for your well considered reply Amelia. Like us RUDE Guys, you really do ‘get it’. Yes, according to my research 95 per cent of what we toss can be recycled. There has to be better ways than landfill. The State Government of Victoria should be ashamed of its approach to waste management in the world’s most liveable city. But there is hope when something like this initiative is reported on and shared widely. Go Sweden!!

      Liked by 1 person

      • interesting Karen – “World’s most liveable city” – Melborne? really! Then they should be ashamed. They should use that status to show their commitment to 95% recycling. Here, we have bin collections weekly, but recycle collections fortnightly – HOWEVER – my largest amount of debris is the recycling bin.

        My county Devon has a fairly good record for recycling, but they built a £5Mn incinerator. That incinerator ‘Devon Contract Waste’ burnt down this March. Shocking fumes. There were always crates of stinking textiles for recycling dumped in their yard, giving off the most incredible stench. After the fire, that stench combined with burning metal, and the west wind blew it our way for several days. Aarrgghhh!
        http://resource.co/article/exeter-waste-site-heavily-damaged-devastating-fire-11708

        Like

  2. Pingback: Recycle Shopping Centre – Shamanic Nights Ethical Fashion

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