The world’s first mall for recycled goods

In Melbourne, Australia, the city of Melton where us RUDE Guys live, our State Government of Victoria has given the go ahead for the large expansion of a landfill. This landfill is set to take rubbish from all over Melbourne and its outer suburbs for the next 13 years.

Australian TIP SHOPS at municipal Recycling Centres have a long long way to go. We could definitely learn something from the Tuna recycling model mall. It’s one type of mall us RUDE Guys would enjoy the window shopping.

Make Wealth History

Last week I wrote about the Edinburgh Remakery, and how they are trying to foster a culture of repair. It’s one of the most shared posts I’ve ever written, and there’s clearly a real interest in this whole idea. Lots of you have been in touch to share similar projects, including this one from Sweden.

ReTuna Återbruksgalleria is a mall dedicated entirely to repaired and upcycled goods. It combines a traditional municipal recycling centre with a shopping centre, so that people can drop off goods that they no longer need, and then browse for something new – perhaps stopping off at the cafe in between. It’s the first mall of its kind in Sweden, and as far as they know, the first in the world.

Staff at the recycling depot intercept and sort incoming goods as they are dropped off, putting aside those that can be repaired or refurbished…

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Every town needs a remakery

Us RUDE Guys strongly agree with Sophie. And repair skills whilst appreciated by the minority are not embraced by the majority. Why repair when you can buy something new is what we hear most of the time. Oftentimes people have not thought out why repair is of value but when it is explained to them, a light usually goes on.

We are having our first repair event in our local town on the 8th April, 2017. You can find out more on our Facebook open group @menditmelton

Make Wealth History

The Edinburgh Remakery is a social enterprise that teaches repair. The shop sells refurbished computers and furniture, and hosts workshops where people can come along and learn how to repair their own things. There’s a big vision behind it: “we want to generate a repair revolution. This means changing the way people use and dispose of resources, encouraging manufacturers to build things to last and to be fixable, and making sure the facilities are in place to allow people to repair and reuse.”

The Remakery was founded by Sophie Unwin, after spending a year in Nepal. There she saw a culture of repair and stewardship that was absent in our own throwaway society – but it used to be there. Previous generations knew how to fix things. This generation just needs some re-skilling, access to the tools to do it, and some encouragement to give it a go. It’s…

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